AMERICAN INDIANS IN TEXAS AT THE SPANISH COLONIAL MISSIONS INVITES YOU TO JOIN US FOR A SCREENING AND DISCUSSION OF

THE CONDOR & THE EAGLE

DEFENDING THE EARTH:

Indigenous Voices Demand Environmental Justice


WEDNESDAY, June 30th at 4pm PT / 5MT / 6CT / 7pm ET
- Register to watch the film - Green bar at the bottom of the screen 
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PANEL DISCUSSION will start at 7:30pm CT HERE
- Donations encouraged:
PAYPAL - HERE

CREDIT CARD - HERE
("Contribute" - "Donate With Card For An Event" - "AMERICAN INDIANS IN TEXAS")


American Indians In Texas At The Spanish Colonial Missions's work of preserving the culture and traditions of our Indigenous people rests on the preservation of healthy ecosystems. While the colonial system of exploitation and extraction continues to disregard humanity’s sacred connection with the natural world, Indigenous climate activists persistently demand environmental justice. Please join us for this exclusive screening of the acclaimed documentary film, The Condor & The Eagle, which portrays the leadership and contributions of several Indigenous climate activists working across the American continent to protect their communities and the Earth. Join us after the film to hear our panelists discuss how we can move forward in these efforts as a collective.

DONATIONS ENCOURAGED
This event is inclusive, free to those who can't afford it. For all others, except for students who are not expected to donate, suggested donations on a sliding scale of $15-100 are requested in lieu of a flat ticket price. Your donations will support The Tāp Pīlam Legal Defense Fund which is dedicated to the protection and reclamation of Native American remains of all tribal communities of Texas. This fund is devoted to defending the rights of Native people to the remains of their ancestors. TPLDF is currently working to defend the sacredness of Native burial sites in and around San Antonio’s missions. The fund is engaged in a federal lawsuit over the $450 million renovation of Alamo Plaza, which stands on the site of a 300-year-old cemetery containing the remains of over 1,000 people, most of them Native Americans. Part of the funds collected will also support the film impact campaign "No More Sacrificed Communities" and be used to provide small honorariums to our panelists.

PayPal - Click Here
Credit Card - Click Here 
​​​​​​​(then, click "CONTRIBUTE" on the Main Menu at the top of the page, "Donate with Card For An Event" and select "AMERICAN INDIANS IN TEXAS" as the event you are donating to)

  • "NO MORE SACRIFICED COMMUNITIES"

    By joining us for this screening, you are supporting effective movement-building towards powerful change and calls to action. This event is part of the film impact campaign "No More Sacrificed Communities".

    Our past Impact Series were very successful as more than 25K people watched our film, we raised more than $120K for frontline communities and 500K+ people watched our panel discussions! Our online events mobilize hundreds of communities and organizations, presenting to large audiences the inspiring work being done by land defenders across the Americas. Join us and support frontline communities!

    You can reach out directly to the film impact team here: [email protected]



  • CASEY CAMP-HORINEK

    Film Protagonist. Hereditary Drumkeeper of the Womens’ Scalp Dance Society of the Ponca Nation of Oklahoma. Because of Casey’s work the Ponca Nation is the first Tribe in the State of Oklahoma to adopt the Rights of Nature Statute, and to pass a moratorium on Fracking on Tribal Lands. In addition to her leadership as part of Movement Rights’ Board, Casey Camp Horinek leads Movement Rights' Ponca Rights of Nature program, and co-leads Movement Rights' Intertribal Rights of Nature (IRON) forums, connecting tribal communities across Turtle Island interested in or actively working on passing Rights of Nature into tribal law

  • BRYAN PARRAS

    Film Protagonists - Bryan Parras is a lifelong organizer, media maker, eco-guerrero and cultural accelerator from Houston's East End. His work has focused primarily on cultural revitalization and environmental justice. For 15 years, Bryan volunteered as a co-producer of Nuestra Palabra's Radio Show and helped organize events including monthly literary events at Talento Bilingue de Houston and the annual Edward James Olmos Latino Book & Family Festival which drew upwards of 30,000 attendees. Bryan co-founded Texas Environmental Justice Advocacy Services (t.e.j.a.s.) and served as an Advisor to the Gulf Coast Fund in the pivotal aftermath and recovery of Hurricane Katrina. He led delegations to BP shareholder meetings in London and helped distribute millions of dollars to local organizations in the Gulf Coast. Bryan now works for the Sierra Club's Healthy Communities Campaign and has been focused on building a Just Recovery framework in the Gulf South after Hurricane Harvey struck Houston in 2017. Bryan is an active collaborator with Another Gulf is Possible and recently joined the board of Saphichay.

  • KARLA LORENA AGUILAR (AITSCM)

    Karla Lorena Aguilar is in service to AIT-SCM advocating for a deeper understanding of the contributions of San Antonio’s Aboriginal people, while uplifting Indigenous people everywhere. Karla is a native of El Salvador, a cultural bearer of the Nahua-Tolteka traditions, language and cosmology as a descendant of the Nahua Pipil, and is an adopted member of the Tap Pilam Coahuiltecan Nation of the Auteca Paguame Tribe.

  • ISAAC "PAPA BEAR" CARDENAS (TPCN)

    Isaac “Papa Bear” Alvarez Cardenas is a member of the Tap Pilam Coahuiltecan Nation, son of a Comanche/Apache mother and a Tap Pilam Coahuiltecan father. He was raised in the Wana-Kan-Wa-Pupaco, commonly known as the inner city westside of San Antonio, Texas. He helped to found AIT and retired after twenty years of service there. He consults on and develops culturally competent and inclusive programs and treatment centers for Native American Indians, Alaskan Natives, and Pacific Islanders at a local, statewide and national level.

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