ALWAYS INIDIGENOUS MEDIA AND DEFEND THE SACRED ALASKA PRESENT A SCREENING & DISCUSSION OF

THE CONDOR & THE EAGLE

DEFEND THE SACRED - PROTECT THE ARCTIC
REGISTER to watch the film / Donations encouraged

Sunday, December 20th at 3:30pm AKST / 4:30 PT/ 7:30pm ET
Q&A starts at 5pm AKST / 6 PT / 9pm ET - HERE and will be live on Native Movement's Facebook page HERE.


In the Gwich’in language, "Iizhik Gwats’an Gwandaii Goodlit" means The Sacred Place Where Life Begins. This place is otherwise known as the “1002 area” of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

In 1987, Congress designated 1.5-million-acres of the coastal plain (section 1002) of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to be reserved for potential oil and gas exploration and to be protected as habitat for critical species in the North. But now, the Bureau of Land Management and the Trump Administration, has announced their rushed lease sale in the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge kicking off 30 Days of Public Comment before the sale on January 6th.

Native Movement, with partners and protectors around the world, are taking action during these 30 days. Join us for this important film and a discussion with protectors in Alaska about where we stand in defense of the Arctic as a whole, and our vision to transition away from extractive economies, and towards regenerative, Indigenous led solutions.

​​​​​REGISTER to watch the film using the green bar at the bottom of the page

DONATIONS ENCOURAGED: 

PayPal - Click Here

Credit Card - Click Here 
​​​​​​​(then, click "CONTRIBUTE" on the Main Menu at the top of the page, "Donate with Card For An Event" and select "Always Indigenous Media and Defend The Sacred Alaska" as the event you are donating to)

  • DONATION-BASED EVENT

    This event is inclusive, free to those who can't afford it. For all others, suggested donations on a sliding scale of $15-100 are requested in lieu of a flat ticket price. The funds are raised for Native Movement and will be distributed to Always Indigenous Media and Defend the Sacred AK. The donations collected will also support the Indigenous Environmental Network's work, the film impact campaign "No More Sacrificed Communities" and be used to provide small honorariums to our panelists and filmmakers for their time and expertise. Please give generously according to your financial situation.

    Always Indigenous Media is a grassroots media project by the members of Defend the Sacred AK. We believe in uplifting the voices of those who are on the front lines, whoʼs communities are fighting for Indigenous rights and sovereignty, for the land, and for our peoples.

    Defend the Sacred AK  is an Alaskan movement to boldly uplift our sacred connection to each other, the earth, and all living beings. Our path of decolonization is guided by Indigenous voices and place-based knowledge. It is our responsibility to Unlearn, Dismantle, and Heal.
     
    All of our efforts and fundraising will be to support organizing to #ProtectTheArctic - In the Gwich’in language, "Iizhik Gwats’an Gwandaii Goodlit" means The Sacred Place Where Life Begins. This place is otherwise known as the “1002 area” of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

  • "NO MORE SACRIFICED COMMUNITIES"

    By joining us for this screening, you are supporting effective movement-building towards powerful change and calls to action. This event is part of the film impact campaign "No More Sacrificed Communities".

    Our first events in July were a huge success. 6,000 people watched our film, 150,000 watched our panel discussions and we raised more than $25,000 for impacted communities. We therefore decided to keep organizing events on an even larger scale: we are currently organizing more than 40 online events until December (FALL IMPACT SERIES), mobilizing hundreds of communities and organizations, presenting to large audiences the inspiring work being done by land defenders across the Americas. Join us and support frontline communities!

    You can reach out directly to the film impact team here: [email protected]



  • CASEY CAMP-HORINEK

    Film Protagonist. Hereditary Drumkeeper of the Womens’ Scalp Dance Society of the Ponca Nation of Oklahoma. Because of Casey’s work the Ponca Nation is the first Tribe in the State of Oklahoma to adopt the Rights of Nature Statute, and to pass a moratorium on Fracking on Tribal Lands.

  • YUDITH AZARETH NIETO

    Film Protagonist. Yudith a queer Mexican-American artist, interpreter, and organizer, enjoying spending time in the bayous of Louisiana. She is part of the core leadership circle for Another Gulf Is Possible and a youth organizer with Los Jardines Institute. For over 5 years, Yudith has been fighting for the rights of her fenceline community in Manchester, Houston in collaboration with T.E.J.A.S, and last year was named one of Grist.org 50 Fixers of 2018.

  • RUTH MILLER

    Ruth is a Dena'ina Athabaskan and Ashkenazi Russian Jewish woman, raised in Anchorage, Alaska. She is a member of the Curyung Tribe, and also has roots in Bristol Bay, where her family descended downriver after leaving the Lake Iliamna region. She is a recent graduate from Brown University, built on occupied Wampanoag and Narragansett lands, and received a BA in Critical Development Studies with a focus on Indigenous resistance and liberation. She has worked many years towards Indigenous rights advocacy and climate justice in Alaska, as well as in Rhode Island and the south of Chile. She centers themes of wellness and community care, and is thinking a lot about growth and regeneration and imagination in our activism work. Ruth also does International Indigenized climate justice work with the United Nations Association and SustainUS. Most of all, she loves singing as her Grandma Ruth did, practicing traditional beadwork with her mother late at night, slowly discovering her Dena'ina language, and building radical communities of love!

  • NAAWÉIYAA AUSTIN TAGABAN

    Naawéiyaa is Lingít, Cherokee, Pilipino, and English. Naawéiyaa is Kaagwaantaan from Khóok Hít. He is Tʼakhdeintaan yádi and Wooshkeetaan dachxhán. He is a basket weaver, screen printer, musician, language learner and teacher. Naawéiyaa was born and raised in Juneau Alaska. His grandparents on his dadʼs side are Joe and and Wilma Tagaban. His grandparents on his mothers side are Irene and Arthur Robinson and David and Eloise Harman. He cares deeply about Language revitalization, Indigenous sovereignty, Gender and Climate Justice, and Ending Gender Based Violence. He has a Bachelors of Liberal Arts with an Emphasis in Alaska Native Languages and Studies and in his spare time he’s working on a B.S. in Mathematics and a Tlingit Language Teaching Certificate.

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