TONANTZIN SOCIETY & MULVANE ART MUSEUM SCREENING & DISCUSSION OF

THE CONDOR & THE EAGLE
HOSTILE TERRAIN 94: LOOKING TO OUR ANCESTORS

Washburn University, Hostile Terrain 94, Tonantzin Society and the Mulvane Art Museum continue their collaboration and bring to you The Condor & The Eagle. To understand the treacherous journey migrants make, we must delve deeper into the problems migrants face in their native lands. Global climate injustice creates uninhabitable or very hostile regions, forcing thousands to make the perilous journey to the United States. Deaths from border crossing have surpassed 4,000 since 1994.

By featuring an indigenous perspective with a focus on our planet, we hope to amplify the dangers of climate change and how all exacerbate the migration/asylum crisis throughout the Americas. We seek solutions and ideas that can propel our call for human rights and environmental justice forward Our Mother Earth, and we as her children, are increasingly vulnerable.  


REGISTER TO ATTEND (at the bottom of the page)

Friday, October 16th
3:30PM PT / 4:30 MT / 5:30 CT / 6:30 ET / 7:30PM AT
Q&A starts at 7:15pm CT - HERE - and will be live on Tonantzin Society's Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/TonantzinSociety

  • "NO MORE SACRIFICED COMMUNITIES"

    By joining us for this screening, you are supporting effective movement-building towards powerful change and calls to action. This event is part of the film impact campaign "No More Sacrificed Communities".

    Our first events in July were a huge success. 6.000 people watched our film, 150.000 watched our panel discussions and we raised more than $25.000 for impacted communities. We therefore decided to keep organizing events on an even larger scale: we are currently organizing more than 100 online events until December, mobilizing hundreds of communities and organizations, presenting to large audiences the inspiring work being done by land defenders across the Americas. Join us and support frontline communities!

  • CASEY CAMP-HORINEK

    Film Protagonist. Hereditary Drumkeeper of the Womens’ Scalp Dance Society of the Ponca Nation of Oklahoma. Because of Casey’s work the Ponca Nation is the first Tribe in the State of Oklahoma to adopt the Rights of Nature Statute, and to pass a moratorium on Fracking on Tribal Lands.

  • YUDITH AZARETH NIETO

    Film Protagonist. Yudith a queer Mexican-American artist, interpreter, and organizer, enjoying spending time in the bayous of Louisiana. She is part of the core leadership circle for Another Gulf Is Possible and a youth organizer with Los Jardines Institute. For over 5 years, Yudith has been fighting for the rights of her fenceline community in Manchester, Houston in collaboration with T.E.J.A.S, and last year was named one of Grist.org 50 Fixers of 2018.

  • BRYAN PARRAS

    Film Protagonist - Xicano Houston, TX - Healthy Communities Organizer with Sierra Club and Co-Founder of t.e.j.a.s. He is a longtime environmental justice advocate based in Houston, TX. He co-founded the Librotraficante movement, serves as an Advisor to the Gulf Coast Fund, and sits on the board of the Environmental Support Center. Bryan was recently awarded a Gulf Coast Fellowship and has been working to help organizations use media for education, organizing, and advocacy.

  • FERNANDA PRECIADO

    Panel Moderator. Fernanda is a Xicana that makes her home in and outside the United States. She is the Culturally Relevant Pedagogy intern for Tonantzin Society. Her work focuses on social justice for BIPOC through the academic, cultural, and political lens.

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